Dizzy, MS and possible redundancy…

Me and Dizzy had abit of a stressful week last week. For the first time we’re facing possible redundancy and it’s got us thinking about employment and MS.

dizzy-work

Having MS has always made me feel vulnerable when it comes to work. I’m one of those people that worries far to much about letting people down and I’ve always worried what my employers would think. Would they think I was too unreliable? Not fit for the job? This is partly why I kept my condition a secret at work until recently. As it turned out they’ve been amazing about it! 🙂

Loads of positives have come from this and it’s made me feel so much more secure in my job. Until this. First I sat and worried about whether my condition would effect their decision and then I also started worrying if I am made redundant what do you tell people at an interview?! I know it’s illegal for people to discriminate against you for having a disability but I can’t help but wonder if it always works like that. Really I know at my work it won’t be taken into consideration, but especially with things like job interviews, how do you know that having MS doesn’t effect their decisions in some way?

At the moment I’m on orders from HR to look after myself to try and avoid the stress setting of the MS…I couldn’t help but wonder if I told them I definitely thought it would that they’d tell me my job was safe? But I don’t think it works like that. So me and Dizzy are trying to be stress free :/ and I’m wondering if my best option would be to send Dizzy to the meetings this week. I think she would do a better job at these sorts of things than me…no one could tell little Dizzy she was redundant could they?

IMG_1451 (2).JPG

We’re hoping we won’t have to be applying for any new jobs but it has got us thinking about it. Has anyone else faced the problem of not knowing whether to disclose their medical condition in certain situations? What did you decide to do and what was the response? xxx

 

42 thoughts on “Dizzy, MS and possible redundancy…

  1. cathysrealcountrygardencom says:

    I feel for you. Seems like no ones job is secure these days. I do regret telling my employer about my diagnosis, because it gave me no advantages and like you it makes me worry I am seen as weak. As my health has been very good, there is no reason to have told them ,but I didn’t know that at the time.
    The wheel of fate turns and you can’t control it, but if you feel reasonably well, I se no reason to tell your next employer. Deep breath.

    Liked by 1 person

    • dinosaursdonkeysandms says:

      It does seem like that. 😦 I only told them when I had to because of a relapse. Before that it was on my file but none of my managers actually knew. I was already working there when my MS started. Did any issues come up from telling them? And thank you for the advice. 🙂 xxx

      Like

  2. cathysrealcountrygardencom says:

    No, issues but they ask a lot of questions if I am off sick with ordinary stuff like a cold. I am in much better shape than I expected to be as the medication really seems to work and with hind sight I wish I had never told them, but at the time I thought I was going to need all the help I could get. Redundancy can happen to anyone and if it does happen you mustn’t think it is because if the MS. You just get back on the horse and keep riding!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. anne leueen says:

    Oh my I can understand the worry. The person who is my coaches assistant here in Ontario was diagnosed with MS two years ago. Her job is very physical as it involves riding horses. She told all of us at the barn and told her employer ( my coach). The response was to just carry on and see how it went. If she was unable to continue riding then they would cross that bridge then. So far the young woman has responded well to medication and has continued on. I know it worries her as her career relies on her being able to ride horses and sometimes difficult ones. I wish you the best and I will pray for serenity for you and for Dizzy to get through these meetings.

    Liked by 1 person

    • dinosaursdonkeysandms says:

      That must be a worry when your career is so physical. I’m so glad she’s doing well though on medication and has continued with her job. Thank you! The meetings shouldn’t be too bad as it’s more just finding out what position I’m in and they’re with supportive people. It’s just the worry of what my situation is at the moment. xxx

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Wheel Chic Home says:

    I would absolutely tell them. MS is a “protected characteristic” in employment law which means they have to be extremely careful and can’t get rid of you under normal conditions just because you have MS (health and safety exclusions may be an exception of course, if you’re a crane operator for example!) In a redundancy situation I don’t think it means your job is any more safe than others but they may have to go prove it more vigourously and also make sure they follow the letter of the law much more carefully. Absolutely tell them. If you don’t and they aren’t aware then you have no recourse from a legal stand point.

    Liked by 2 people

    • dinosaursdonkeysandms says:

      Thank you for the advice. My current employers do know and have been really good about it! It is a redundancy situation and definitely hasn’t come up because I have MS. It’s more just my worry that people do consider it, especially in new situations like job interviews where they don’t know you. It’s something I’ve never had to think about before. xxx

      Liked by 1 person

      • Wheel Chic Home says:

        I’ve just been made redundant and when looking for jobs in the last few weeks I’ve seen some employers mention that if you meet the criteria for the role you are guaranteed an interview if you have a disability. So I would also mention it in an interview situation as they have to make provision for you if you need a parking space or whatever. It’s easy for me to say I suppose because I’m not the one with MS in our house but the husband would disclose it because it means he has a level of protection. Good luck with the job hunt!

        Liked by 1 person

      • dinosaursdonkeysandms says:

        I have heard that aswell about them having to give you an interview. I’m still hoping I won’t actually need to start job hunting but thank you so much for the advice. Good luck with your job search and really hope you find something soon. I never realised how often people are made redundant. :/ xxx

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Flor says:

    I really hope you get better soon and without stress. I live with anxiety so I completely understand how you feel, but don’t worry! Having your first job means learning, and making mistakes. That’s the only way you’ll learn! Try to focus on feeling positive, and relaxed, so you can actually enjoy the process! xx

    https://mateandbizcochitos.com/

    Liked by 1 person

    • dinosaursdonkeysandms says:

      I struggle with anxiety too which always makes everything harder to deal with. I’m had a couple of jobs now but they are all learning experiences. I always think thats a good way of looking at life too! Me and Dizzy are definitely putting our efforts into feeling relaxed. 🙂 Thank you for your comment. 🙂 xxx

      Liked by 1 person

  6. fearlessinjesuschrist says:

    I was working for a company that had programs for adults with disabilities. So I felt very comfortable and disclosing I am S. My bosses mother actually had had MS. But as the company kept losing money, I was laid off. And as I would go into interviews either with a cane or without a cane, and walking unsteadily, I was never considered for another job. So I am now in forced retirement. It’s a very unsettling situation. I have since tried to get several part-time jobs. I have tons of education and experience, but no one is looking at me for any position.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. tresswann says:

    I have never disclosed. At my original place when things started happening I told them it wasn’t cancer, contagious nor did it effect my brain. I was let go by a reorganization. I found myself looking for a job as an older disabled woman. I never disclosed. I definitely lost jobs once they saw me wobble. I did get something after a year and a half. They forgot I can’t really walk during interview. After officially I refused to disclose and just said autoimmune

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Felicia Denise says:

    I told my employer about my Fibromyalgia diagnosis from the beginning because I needed “reasonable accommodations” made in order for me to continue working. I never had any problems and did receive two promotions, but after almost two years, I couldn’t continue. The pain was constant, and all the issues which accompany the condition – fatigue, memory fog, neuropathy, etc. – only made my situation worse.

    I admire anyone with a chronic illness who can still work a full-time (or part-time) job! Good luck to you! ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    • dinosaursdonkeysandms says:

      Thank you Felicia! I’m glad your employer was so good though and you still received two promotions! That’s brave of you to except it was time to leave because of your health. It really does have to come first otherwise it does just make it worse. xxx

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Ms JenY says:

    I’ve been through this myself and responses to disclosing my condition have varied. In the vast majority of cases people have been supportive and have gone out of their way to make sure I could cope with work. On the occasions that I have been unsupported or have been discriminated against I ended up walking away and that worked to my benefit. Of course that isn’t easy but your heath must come first and you need to surround yourself with people who understand that. Best of luck and you always have support here 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • dinosaursdonkeysandms says:

      Thank you so much Jeny! It’s true, if you don’t put your health first it get worse and it’s not worth that. I have been really lucky at work but it’s just thinking how people react in situations when they more don’t know you. Like interviews! Hoping it won’t come to that but it is on my mind. Are they supportive at the job you have now? And thank you! Everyone in the blogging community is so amazing and supportive! 🙂 xxx

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Ms JenY says:

    Unformtintly I had to stop working but my employer were just amazing and super supportive. They are still supportive friends now that I am no longer an employee and we still keep in contact.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. manyofus1980 says:

    I have epilepsy and while I don’t work because of disabilities that are mental illnesses and blindness I have the same concerns, when should you disclose and what is enough to disclose how much is too much and when and how and all that? yeah I get ya. is dizzy your dog or cat? I have my guide dog nitro. if you’d like to follow my blog I blog about therapy and living with mental illness over at http://therapybits.com/ xo

    Liked by 1 person

    • dinosaursdonkeysandms says:

      It is really difficult and when you don’t know the person you never know how it will be taken. I think its better to disclose near the start but whether at interview stage or not I don’t know. :-\ Dizzy is the knitted donkey in the photos! Absolutely love dogs and cats though. Will definitely check out your blog. Thank you for visiting mine. 🙂 xxx

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s